Does teaching young children with disabilities to read facilitate their language development? a critical review of current theory and empirical evidence

Coral Kemp*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Instruction in reading has been an important component of many early intervention programs for children with disabilities over the past two decades. Justification for the inclusion of reading, prior to the age when it is traditionally taught to children with normal development, has included the importance of reading as a life skill and the value of teaching reading in a systematic, individualised program with the reduced risk of failure. It has also been argued that the teaching of reading, at a time when oral language skills are emerging, will enhance the development of speech and language skills. This proposition is an interesting one in view of the belief, commonly held by educators, that reading needs to be established on a firm language base and that good language skills will enhance the acquisition of reading skills. This paper explores the theoretical and empirical support for the teaching of reading as a supportive language development program for young children with disabilities.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)175-187
Number of pages13
JournalInternational Journal of Disability, Development and Education
Volume43
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1996

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