Does the addition of visceral manipulation improve outcomes for patients with low backpain? Rationale and study protocol

John Panagopoulos*, Mark Hancock, Paulo Ferreira

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: There has been no randomised controlled trial conducted to investigate the effectiveness of visceral manipulation (VM) for the treatment of low back pain (LBP). The primary aim of this study would be to investigate whether the addition of VM, to a standard physiotherapy treatment regimen, improves pain 6 weeks post treatment commencement in people with LBP. Secondary aims would be to examine the effect of VM on disability and functional outcomes at 2, 6 and 52 weeks post-treatment commencement and pain at 2 and 52 weeks. Methods: This paper describes the rationale and design of a randomised controlled trial investigating the addition of VM to a standard physiotherapy treatment algorithm which includes manual therapy, specific exercise and functional exercise prescription. Analysis of data would be carried out by a statistician blinded to group allocation and by intention-to-treat.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)339-343
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2013

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