Does the 'Young Learner' exist? A systemic functional investigation of mood and make believe in the speech of Korean children and their teachers

David Kellogg*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The 'Young Learner' has proved extremely lucrative as a market niche, especially-but not exclusively-in language education. Yet as a theoretical construct, it remains poorly defined and undifferentiated (in Korea it refers mainly to preschool and early elementary grades, while elsewhere it can be used freely from infancy to adolescence). This paper uses a systemic-functional investigation of two moments in the early school lives of Korean children to show their specificity; we use an analysis of Mood use to show how Korean teachers find out whether children can or cannot tell their teachers what they can and cannot do using the honorific sub-system of Korean Mood, and an analysis of Transitivity and embedding to show how Korean teachers attempt to teach make-believe to children. We end with some modest but practical pedagogical conclusions taken from the data itself. Less modestly, we argue that the 'Young Learner' should be retired.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-13
Number of pages13
JournalLinguistics and Education
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • systemic-functional linguistics
  • Halliday
  • Vygotsky
  • young Learner
  • mood
  • make believe
  • Korean

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Does the 'Young Learner' exist? A systemic functional investigation of mood and make believe in the speech of Korean children and their teachers'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this