Doing “diagnosis”

using critical disability studies to inform academic literacy policy and practice

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

Abstract

With the widening participation agenda has come a concern for effective support of this diversity of students. Early diagnostic assessments used to identify students needing support with their development of academic literacies have been recognised as one source of information to help identify and support of students at risk. This paper discusses the issues raised by the administration of a diagnostic academic literacy test in an introductory media studies unit. Analysis of this small-scale qualitative study, which investigated the responses to staff and students to the diagnostic test, suggest the purchase of key ideas from critical disability studies. Critical disability studies’ extensive consideration of the consequences of identifying and labelling students according to a "diagnosis” is discussed here in relation to the ethical issues arising from the use of diagnostic testing and the sharing of information about student performance amongst teaching staff.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 1st International Australasian Conference on Enabling Access to Higher Education
PublisherNational Committee for Enabling Educators (NCEE)
Pages454-462
Number of pages9
ISBN (Print)1876346639
Publication statusPublished - 2011
EventInternational Australasian Conference on Enabling Access to Higher Education (1st : 2011) - Adelaide
Duration: 5 Dec 20117 Dec 2011

Conference

ConferenceInternational Australasian Conference on Enabling Access to Higher Education (1st : 2011)
CityAdelaide
Period5/12/117/12/11

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  • Cite this

    Simon, J., Matthews, N., & Kelly, E. (2011). Doing “diagnosis”: using critical disability studies to inform academic literacy policy and practice. In Proceedings of the 1st International Australasian Conference on Enabling Access to Higher Education (pp. 454-462). National Committee for Enabling Educators (NCEE).