Duration of physical activity is normal but frequency is reduced after stroke: An observational study

Matar Abdullah Alzahrani, Louise Ada, Catherine M. Dean

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Question: What is the free-living physical activity of community-dwelling people with stroke compared with that of agematched healthy controls? Design: A cross-sectional observational study. Participants: 42 people with stroke and 21 agematched healthy controls aged 52 to 87 years living in Sydney, Australia. Outcome measures: Free-living physical activity was measured using the Intelligent Device for Energy Expenditure and Activity (IDEEA) and reported as duration (time on feet in min) and frequency (activity counts). Results: People with stroke spent 79 (95% CI 20 to 138) fewer min on their feet and performed 5308 (95% CI 3171 to 7445) fewer activity counts than healthy controls. The observation period of the free-living physical activity of stroke survivors was significantly less than that of the healthy controls. Data adjusted to a fixed observation period (12 hr) showed no relative difference in time on feet between the groups (mean difference 36 min, 95% CI -27 to 99) but that people after stroke still had relatively fewer activity counts than healthy controls (mean difference 4062 counts, 95% CI 1787 to 6337). Conclusions: The reduction in physical activity after stroke is not primarily because of a decrease in the time spent being active but rather a decrease in frequency of activity during that time. Future research into physical activity after stroke needs to consider energy expenditure because stroke survivors exhibit a reduced frequency of physical activity due to the nature of their impairments.

LanguageEnglish
Pages47-51
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Physiotherapy
Volume57
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Observational Studies
Stroke
Exercise
Foot
Energy Metabolism
Survivors
Observation
Independent Living
Cross-Sectional Studies
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Equipment and Supplies

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Publisher [2011]. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

Cite this

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abstract = "Question: What is the free-living physical activity of community-dwelling people with stroke compared with that of agematched healthy controls? Design: A cross-sectional observational study. Participants: 42 people with stroke and 21 agematched healthy controls aged 52 to 87 years living in Sydney, Australia. Outcome measures: Free-living physical activity was measured using the Intelligent Device for Energy Expenditure and Activity (IDEEA) and reported as duration (time on feet in min) and frequency (activity counts). Results: People with stroke spent 79 (95{\%} CI 20 to 138) fewer min on their feet and performed 5308 (95{\%} CI 3171 to 7445) fewer activity counts than healthy controls. The observation period of the free-living physical activity of stroke survivors was significantly less than that of the healthy controls. Data adjusted to a fixed observation period (12 hr) showed no relative difference in time on feet between the groups (mean difference 36 min, 95{\%} CI -27 to 99) but that people after stroke still had relatively fewer activity counts than healthy controls (mean difference 4062 counts, 95{\%} CI 1787 to 6337). Conclusions: The reduction in physical activity after stroke is not primarily because of a decrease in the time spent being active but rather a decrease in frequency of activity during that time. Future research into physical activity after stroke needs to consider energy expenditure because stroke survivors exhibit a reduced frequency of physical activity due to the nature of their impairments.",
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Duration of physical activity is normal but frequency is reduced after stroke : An observational study. / Alzahrani, Matar Abdullah; Ada, Louise; Dean, Catherine M.

In: Journal of Physiotherapy, Vol. 57, No. 1, 03.2011, p. 47-51.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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