Dynamics of co-occurring frog species in three ponds utilized by the endangered Green and Golden Bell Frog Litoria aurea

Graham H. Pyke*, Arthur W. White

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Populations of five frog species were monitored at three ponds utilized by the endangered Green and Golden Bell Frog Litoria aurea over a three year period 1993-1996. Litoria aurea bred at the two semi-permanent ponds with fluctuating water levels but did not breed at the permanent pond with a relatively constant water level, though it was abundant there. Other frog species generally bred at all ponds where they were found. At the semi-permanent ponds the numbers of the various frog species fluctuated, but there were no apparent long-term trends. On the other hand, at the permanent pond there were changes through time in both plant and frog species. As the pond aged, the relative abundance of various species of emergent aquatic plants changed, the area of open water steadily decreased, and the depth decreased. Over the same period, the relative abundance of several frog species changed with the most abundant species being first L. aurea and then Limnodynastes peronii, and finally Crinia signifera increased to become co-dominant with Lim. peronii. The temporal changes in the numbers of each species were attributed to the changes in the condition of the ponds.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)230-239
Number of pages10
JournalAustralian Zoologist
Volume31
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1999
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Abundance
  • Community
  • Endangered
  • Frog

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