Dynastic Wars, 260–145 BC

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Division of the post-Alexander world did not lead to a cessation of hostilities. Competition for influence in the Aegean Greek world led to several substantial naval engagements, while competing claims to Palestine and Syria resulted in a series of “Syrian” wars between Ptolemies and Seleucids. One result of these protracted conflicts, which diminished Macedonian resources and forced the successor kingdoms to rely increasingly on non-Greek forces, was the emergence of other powers: the Parthians on the Iranian plateau and Pergamum in western Asia Minor, where Gallic migrants had been threatening the safety of Greek cities.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Encyclopedia of Ancient Battles
EditorsMichael Whitby, Harry Sidebottom
Place of PublicationChichester
PublisherWiley-Blackwell, Wiley
Pages629-647
Number of pages19
VolumeII
ISBN (Print)9781405186452
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 May 2017

Fingerprint

Safety
Ptolemies
Naval
Hostility
Migrants
Asia Minor
Plateau
Syria
Palestine
Seleucids
Western Asia
Greek World
Kingdom
Successor
Resources

Keywords

  • Hellenistic
  • History
  • Antigonids
  • Gauls
  • navies
  • Parthia
  • Pergamum
  • Ptolemies
  • Rome
  • Seleucids

Cite this

McKechnie, P. (2017). Dynastic Wars, 260–145 BC. In M. Whitby, & H. Sidebottom (Eds.), The Encyclopedia of Ancient Battles (Vol. II, pp. 629-647). Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, Wiley. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781119099000.wbabat0280
McKechnie, Paul. / Dynastic Wars, 260–145 BC. The Encyclopedia of Ancient Battles. editor / Michael Whitby ; Harry Sidebottom. Vol. II Chichester : Wiley-Blackwell, Wiley, 2017. pp. 629-647
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McKechnie, P 2017, Dynastic Wars, 260–145 BC. in M Whitby & H Sidebottom (eds), The Encyclopedia of Ancient Battles. vol. II, Wiley-Blackwell, Wiley, Chichester, pp. 629-647. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781119099000.wbabat0280

Dynastic Wars, 260–145 BC. / McKechnie, Paul.

The Encyclopedia of Ancient Battles. ed. / Michael Whitby; Harry Sidebottom. Vol. II Chichester : Wiley-Blackwell, Wiley, 2017. p. 629-647.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

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McKechnie P. Dynastic Wars, 260–145 BC. In Whitby M, Sidebottom H, editors, The Encyclopedia of Ancient Battles. Vol. II. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, Wiley. 2017. p. 629-647 https://doi.org/10.1002/9781119099000.wbabat0280