Economic growth and ecological integrity - The impact of the hazardous waste trade on the economy and environment of developing countries

Zada Lipman*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The electronic waste trade shows how a combination of wasteful consumption in developed countries and globalization can result in environmental injustice. Although the international community has recognized its responsibility to protect developing countries, as exemplified in the adoption of the Basel Convention and ban amendment, implementation of these measures has been difficult. Non-ratification of the ban has highlighted the vulnerability of environmental policies that conflict with economic interests. The economic rationale for hazardous waste exports to developing countries has clarified why these exports take place. The economic contigency perspective explains why developing countries continue to accept them. With an economic rationale for both exports and imports, the whole process is inevitable. Developed countries have a role to play in putting and end to this form of environmental injustice. Specifically, they should assist developing countries to develop their own industries which are not reliant on hazardous waste imports.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)232-239
Number of pages8
JournalEnvironmental Law and Management
Volume18
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2006

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