Editor's Summary and Q&A. Physical properties of root cementum

Part 14. The amount of root resorption after force application for 12 weeks on maxillary and mandibular premolars: A microcomputed-tomography study

Anchalee Paetyangkul, Tamer Türk, Selma Elekdaǧ-Türk, Allan S. Jones, Peter Petocz, M. Ali Darendeliler*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    15 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Introduction: Orthodontic force magnitude is a primary factor in root resorption. Quantitative studies of root resorption after force application for 4 and 8 weeks have been conducted. In this study, we investigated the root surface topography and the amount of root resorption after the application of controlled light and heavy forces in a buccal direction for 12 weeks. In addition, the amounts of root resorption when controlled light and heavy forces were applied to the maxillary and mandibular first premolars were quantified. Methods: Forty maxillary and mandibular first premolars were collected from 10 orthodontic patients (age range, 12.7-18.2 years; mean, 14.3 years). A light buccally directed orthodontic force of 25 g was applied to the experimental tooth on 1 side, and a heavy orthodontic force of 225 g was applied on the contralateral premolar. After 12 weeks of force application, the experimental teeth were extracted and scanned with the microcomputed tomography x-ray system. Resorption craters were analyzed with specially designed software for direct volumetric measurements. The tooth movements produced by light and heavy forces were also measured. Results: There was individual variation in all comparisons. The light force produced significantly less root resorption than did the heavy force. The maxillary first premolars were more likely to suffer from orthodontically induced inflammatory root resorption than the mandibular first premolars (P = 0.036). There was a significant difference between buccal and lingual surfaces (P = 0.003), with greater root resorption on the buccal surface. The distribution pattern of the resorption cavities was greatest in the buccal-cervical, buccal-middle, lingual-middle, and lingual-apical areas in both the light-force and heavy-force groups, corresponding with the pressure zones of tipping movement. The mean amount of tooth movement in the heavy-force group was almost twice as much as in the light-force group. Conclusions: The volume of root resorption craters induced by buccally directed forces for 12 weeks on the maxillary and mandibular first premolars was directly proportional to the magnitude of the force. The maxillary premolars seemed to be more susceptible to orthodontic root resorption than did the mandibular premolars.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)492-493
    Number of pages2
    JournalAmerican Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
    Volume136
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Oct 2009

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