Effect of continuous positive airway pressure treatment on permeability, inflammation and mucus production of human epithelial cells

Sandra Grau-Bartual, Ahmed M. Al-Jumaily, Paul M. Young, Daniela Traini, Maliheh Ghadiri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy is the gold standard treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea, which affects millions of people worldwide. However, this therapy normally results in symptoms such as dryness, sneezing, rhinorrhoea, post-nasal drip, nasal congestion and epistaxis in the upper airways.

Using bronchial epithelial (Calu-3) and nasal epithelial (RPMI 2650) cells in an in vitro respiratory model, this study, for the first time, investigates the effect of CPAP positive pressure on the human respiratory epithelial mechanisms that regulate upper airways lubrication characteristics. To understand how the epithelium and mucus are affected by this therapy, several parameters were determined before and after positive pressure application.

This work demonstrates that the positive pressure not only compresses the cells, but also reduces their permeability and mucus secretion rate, thus drying the airway surface liquid layer and altering the mucus/water ratio. It is also observed that the respiratory epithelia is equally inflamed without or with external humidification during CPAP application.

These findings clearly identify the causes of the side-effects reported by patients under CPAP therapy.
Original languageEnglish
Article number00327-2019
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalERJ Open Research
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2020
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Publisher 2020. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

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