Effect of low-frequency gain and venting effects on the benefit derived from directionality and noise reduction in hearing AIDS

Gitte Keidser*, Lyndal Carter, Josef Chalupper, Harvey Dillon

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

When the frequency range over which vent-transmitted sound dominates amplification increases, the potential benefit from directional microphones and noise reduction decreases. Fitted with clinically appropriate vent sizes, 23 aided listeners with varying low-frequency hearing thresholds evaluated six schemes comprising three levels of gain at 250 Hz (0, 6, and 12 dB) combined with two features (directional microphone and noise reduction) enabled or disabled in the field. The low-frequency gain was 0 dB for vent-dominated sound, while the higher gains were achieved by amplifier-dominated sounds. A majority of listeners preferred 0-dB gain at 250 Hz and the features enabled. While the amount of low-frequency gain had no significant effect on speech recognition in noise or horizontal localization, speech recognition and front/back discrimination were significantly improved when the features were enabled, even when vent-transmitted sound dominated the low frequencies. The clinical implication is that there is no need to increase low-frequency gain to compensate for vent effects to achieve benefit from directionality and noise reduction over a wider frequency range.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)554-568
Number of pages15
JournalInternational Journal of Audiology
Volume46
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2007
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Amplification
  • Directional microphone
  • Field test
  • Horizontal localization
  • Low-frequency gain
  • Noise reduction
  • Paired comparison
  • Speech recognition in noise
  • Venting effects

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