Effects of combining releases of non-viable host eggs with insecticide application on Riptortus pedestris population and its egg parasitoids

Bishwo P. Mainali, Sangwon Kim, Un Taek Lim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Our previous study demonstrated that the release of refrigerated non-viable eggs of Riptortus pedestris (Fabricius) (Hemiptera: Alydidae) enhanced parasitism rates in soybean fields but did not result in the reduction of R. pedestris populations. This study was further conducted using an open-cage exclusion design in a soybean field in order to evaluate the compatibility of combining releases of non-viable host eggs with a single pre-harvest application of insecticide for the control of R. pedestris. Refrigerated eggs of R. pedestris were released twice in treatment plots, and fresh (<1. day old) eggs of R. pedestris were deployed in all experimental arenas, every 6. days, for host resource and measurement of field parasitism. The releases of host eggs did not reduce the number of R. pedestris in any life stage except the adult stage on two sampling dates. However, parasitism by Gryon japonicum (Ashmead) (Hymenoptera: Scelionidae) was higher in treated plots (9-25%) than in the control plots (1-9%). Statistical significant reduction was not found in the pest population, but parasitism rates significantly increased. Pesticide application did not reduce the bug population but did affect the parasitoids population. Pest management tactics, using both artificially deployed host eggs and insecticide, are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)299-305
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Asia-Pacific Entomology
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Ooencyrtus nezarae
  • Gryon japonicum
  • cold storage
  • parasitism
  • thiamethoxam
  • alydid

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