Effects of orthographic and phonological word length on memory for lists shown at RSVP and STM rates

Veronika Coltheart*, Stephen Mondy, Paul E. Dux, Lisa Stephenson

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    9 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This article reports 3 experiments in which effects of orthographic and phonological word length on memory were examined for short lists shown at rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) and short-term memory (STM) rates. Only visual-orthographic length reduced RSVP serial recall, whereas both orthographic and phonological length lowered recall for STM lists in Experiment 1. Word-length effects may arise from output processes or from the temporal duration of output in recall. In 2 further experiments, output demands were reduced through the use of a recognition test. Recognition accuracy was impaired only by orthographic length for RSVP lists and by phonological length for STM lists in both experiments. The results demonstrate 2 item length effects not simply attributable to increased output time in recall, and implications for theories of STM are considered.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)815-826
    Number of pages12
    JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition
    Volume30
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jul 2004

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