Effects of peer-led training on academic self-efficacy, study strategies, and academic performance for first-year university students with and without reading difficulties

Bradley W. Bergey*, Rauno K. Parrila, Annie Laroche, S. Hélène Deacon

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    We examined how participation in peer-led study strategies training for first-year university students was associated with changes in academic self-efficacy and self-reported study strategies as well as with use of support services, academic achievement, and persistence. We examined potential differences for students with (n = 297) and without (n = 677) a history of reading difficulties, since reading difficulty is an indicator of academic vulnerability. Results from a randomized control trial revealed positive effects of the intervention on academic self-efficacy and several aspects of study strategies for both groups of participants. There were no training effects on first-year academic performance or second-year retention for either group. Suggestions of differences in effects across groups emerged in two ways. For participants with a history of reading difficulty, training appeared to increase use of the accessibility center in the subsequent semester and for participants with no history of reading difficulty, training appeared to increase use of other support services. The study suggests the peer-led study strategies program holds promise as a cost-effective approach to supporting the study strategy development of university students with and without reading difficulties.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)25-39
    Number of pages15
    JournalContemporary Educational Psychology
    Volume56
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 2019

    Keywords

    • reading difficulties
    • learning disabilities
    • study skills intervention
    • self-efficacy, university students
    • academic achievement

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