Efficacy of electronic portable assistive devices for people with acquired brain injury: A systematic review

E. Charters*, L. Gillett, G. K. Simpson

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A systematic review was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of electronic portable assistive devices (EPADs) for people with acquired brain injury. A systematic database search (OVID, CINAHL) found 541 citations published between 1989 and the end of 2012. A total of 23 reports met the inclusion/exclusion criteria, namely intervention studies (group, n-of-1) testing the efficacy of EPADs as compensatory devices for cognitive impairment for people with acquired brain injury aged 16-65 years. Study quality was rated by the PEDro (Physiotherapy Evidence Database) scale, (randomised controlled trials), the Downes and Black tool (other group intervention studies), and the Single Case Experimental Design tool (single participant studies). Levels of evidence were determined using five levels of classification based on the Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Evidence table. Results found no Level 1 studies (RCTs with PEDro score ≥ 6), four Level 2 studies and 10 Level 3 studies. There was insufficient evidence to recommend any practice standards, but sufficient evidence to recommend the use of electronic reminder systems in supporting the everyday functioning of people with acquired brain injury as a practice guideline. Higher quality studies are required to support a broader range of compensatory roles that EPADs have the potential to play in neurorehabilitation and the long-term support of people with acquired brain injury.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)82-121
Number of pages40
JournalNeuropsychological Rehabilitation
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Jan 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Acquired brain injury
  • Assistive technology
  • Memory aid
  • Personal digital assistant
  • Smart phone

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