Efficacy of initial antiretroviral therapy for HIV-1 infection in adults

a systematic review and meta-analysis of 114 studies with up to 144 weeks' follow-up

Frederick J. Lee, Janaki Amin, Andrew Carr

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Abstract

Background: A comprehensive assessment of initial HIV-1 treatment success may inform study design and treatment guidelines. Methods: Group-based, systematic review and meta-analysis of initial antiretroviral therapy studies, in adults, of ≥48 weeks duration, reported through December 31, 2012. Size-weighted, intention-to-treat efficacy was calculated. Parameters of study design/eligibility, participant and treatment characteristics were abstracted. Multivariable, random effects, linear regression models with backwards, stepwise selection were then used to identify variables associated with efficacy. Outcome Measures: Antiviral efficacy (undetectable plasma viral load) and premature cessation of therapy. Results: 114 studies were included (216 treatment groups; 40,124 participants; mean CD4 count 248 cells/μL [SD 81]; mean HIV-1 plasma viral load log10 4.9 [SD 0.2]). Mean efficacy across all groups was 60% (SD 16) over a mean 82 weeks' follow-up (SD 38). Efficacy declined over time: 66% (SD 16) at 48 weeks, 60% (SD 16) at 96 weeks, 52% (SD 18) at 144 weeks. The most common reason for treatment cessation was participant decision (11%, SD 6.6). Efficacy was higher with 'Preferred' than 'Alternative' regimens (as defined by 2013 United States antiretroviral guidelines): 75% vs. 65%, respectively, difference 10%; 95%CI 7.6 to 15.4; p<0.001. In 98 groups (45%) reporting efficacy stratified by pre-treatment viral load (< or ≥100,000 copies/mL), efficacy was greater for the lower stratum (70% vs. 62%, respectively, difference 8.4%; 95%CI 6.0 to 10.9; p< 0.001). This difference persisted within 'Preferred' regimens. Greatest efficacy was associated with use of tenofovir-emtricitabine (vs. other nucleoside analogue backbones) and integrase strand transfer inhibitors (vs. other third drug classes). Conclusion: Initial antiretroviral treatments for HIV-1 to date appear to have suboptimal long-term efficacy, but are more effective when commenced at plasma viral loads <100,000 copies/mL. Rising viral load should be considered an indication for starting treatment. Integrase inhibitors offer a treatment advantage (vs. other third drug classes).

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere97482
Pages (from-to)1-19
Number of pages19
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume9
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 May 2014
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author(s) 2014. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

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