Efficiencies of quantum optical detectors

Daniel Hogg, Dominic W. Berry, A. I. Lvovsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

We propose a definition for the efficiency that can be universally applied to all classes of quantum optical detectors. This definition is based on the maximum amount of optical loss that a physically plausible device can experience while still replicating the properties of a given detector. We prove that detector efficiency cannot be increased using linear optical processing. That is, given a set of detectors, as well as arbitrary linear optical elements and ancillary light sources, it is impossible to construct detection devices that would exhibit higher efficiencies than the initial set.

LanguageEnglish
Article number053846
Pages1-4
Number of pages4
JournalPhysical Review A - Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics
Volume90
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25 Nov 2014

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Bibliographical note

Hogg, D., Berry, D. W., & Lvovsky, A. I. (2014). Efficiencies of quantum optical detectors. Physical Review A, 90(5), 053846. Copyright (2014) by the American Physical Society. The original article can be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevA.90.053846

Cite this

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Efficiencies of quantum optical detectors. / Hogg, Daniel; Berry, Dominic W.; Lvovsky, A. I.

In: Physical Review A - Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics, Vol. 90, No. 5, 053846, 25.11.2014, p. 1-4.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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