Egocentric and allocentric learning of social-indexical meaning in American English, Datooga, and Murrinhpatha

Péter Rácz, Alice Mitchell, Joe Blythe

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

    Abstract

    We address competing perspectives on how social-indexical meaning is learned in language, using data from artificial language learning experiments and two studies in small-scale societies. Our results indicate that learning social-indexical
    meaning is primarily allocentric as opposed to egocentric: speaker success in learning a social-indexical meaning pattern depends on overall exposure to the pattern more than the pattern’s relative importance to the speaker. We base these claims on data from American English-speaking adults, Datooga-speaking children, as well as adults and children speaking Murrinhpatha. The results highlight the importance of widening the sample of methods and data sources in studying how variation in language is learned and maintained.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationCogSci 2018
    Subtitle of host publicationProceedings of the 40th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society
    EditorsTim Rogers, Marina Rau, Jerry Zhu, Chuck Kalish
    Place of PublicationAustin, TX
    PublisherCognitive Science Society
    Pages2303-2308
    Number of pages6
    ISBN (Print)9780991196784
    Publication statusPublished - 2018
    EventAnnual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society (40th : 2018) - Madison, United States
    Duration: 25 Jul 201828 Jul 2018

    Conference

    ConferenceAnnual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society (40th : 2018)
    Abbreviated titleCogSci 2018
    CountryUnited States
    CityMadison
    Period25/07/1828/07/18

    Keywords

    • language learning
    • variation
    • American English
    • Datooga
    • Murrinhpatha

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