Electronic mediated marking of student assessments: strategies and techniques to improve the efficiency and consistency in the marking process

Yvette Blount, Paul Micet

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingOther chapter contributionResearch

Abstract

Assessment is a vital part of the learning process. But is it being done efficiently and consistently? The focus of assessment tasks is often on the task itself and its perceived effectiveness in relation to overall learning outcomes, rather than on the logistics of examining, marking and providing adequate and timely feedback. Good assessment strategies require a rubric and marking guide that are consistent with the requirements of the assessment item, are indicative measures of the students’ learning and are highly transparent. These need to be applied consistently across all students, yet a level of tolerance also needs to be factored in. Last, but by no means least, the process has to be done within the confines of strictly limited resources and within tight time frames. For units (subjects) involving large cohorts (200 students and upwards), the logistics can be daunting. Consistency in the application of marking criteria has to be questioned when the marking process is devolved to a number of tutors or examiners. The authors discuss some simple strategies that can be deployed to streamline the logistics by using simple and readily available personal computer applications (Microsoft Word an Excel) to semi-automate the repetitive and mundane aspects of the marking process, thereby producing a high level of control, higher levels of consistency, reduced time taken to complete the process and significantly shorten the time lag to aggregate and release marks. The strategies can be adopted to a variety of situations – numbers oriented assessments (such accounting exercises) or essay style assessments, whether submitted electronically or be paper based. The authors discuss experiences – the “pros and cons” - where the strategies have been deployed to significant advantage – in a cohort of a nominal 500 second year students and another involving 200 masters students. Users (examiners) reported reduced marker fatigue and frustration, whilst other users experienced “technical problems”. The strategies provided good audit trail and back backup ‘disaster’ recovery.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Second Innovation in Accounting and Corporate Governance Education Conference
EditorsN. M. Meyers, B. N. Smith, S. A. Bingham, S. F. Shimeld
Place of PublicationHobart
PublisherSchool of Accounting and Corporate Governance, University of Tasmania
Number of pages1
ISBN (Print)9781862953758
Publication statusPublished - 2007
EventInnovation in Accounting and Corporate Governance Education Conference (2nd : 2007) - Hobart
Duration: 31 Jan 20072 Feb 2007

Conference

ConferenceInnovation in Accounting and Corporate Governance Education Conference (2nd : 2007)
CityHobart
Period31/01/072/02/07

Fingerprint

electronics
efficiency
student
logistics
examiner
frustration
fatigue
tutor
PC
audit
learning
tolerance
learning process
disaster
resources
time
experience

Cite this

Blount, Y., & Micet, P. (2007). Electronic mediated marking of student assessments: strategies and techniques to improve the efficiency and consistency in the marking process. In N. M. Meyers, B. N. Smith, S. A. Bingham, & S. F. Shimeld (Eds.), Proceedings of the Second Innovation in Accounting and Corporate Governance Education Conference Hobart: School of Accounting and Corporate Governance, University of Tasmania.
Blount, Yvette ; Micet, Paul. / Electronic mediated marking of student assessments : strategies and techniques to improve the efficiency and consistency in the marking process. Proceedings of the Second Innovation in Accounting and Corporate Governance Education Conference. editor / N. M. Meyers ; B. N. Smith ; S. A. Bingham ; S. F. Shimeld. Hobart : School of Accounting and Corporate Governance, University of Tasmania, 2007.
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Blount, Y & Micet, P 2007, Electronic mediated marking of student assessments: strategies and techniques to improve the efficiency and consistency in the marking process. in NM Meyers, BN Smith, SA Bingham & SF Shimeld (eds), Proceedings of the Second Innovation in Accounting and Corporate Governance Education Conference. School of Accounting and Corporate Governance, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Innovation in Accounting and Corporate Governance Education Conference (2nd : 2007), Hobart, 31/01/07.

Electronic mediated marking of student assessments : strategies and techniques to improve the efficiency and consistency in the marking process. / Blount, Yvette; Micet, Paul.

Proceedings of the Second Innovation in Accounting and Corporate Governance Education Conference. ed. / N. M. Meyers; B. N. Smith; S. A. Bingham; S. F. Shimeld. Hobart : School of Accounting and Corporate Governance, University of Tasmania, 2007.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingOther chapter contributionResearch

TY - CHAP

T1 - Electronic mediated marking of student assessments

T2 - strategies and techniques to improve the efficiency and consistency in the marking process

AU - Blount, Yvette

AU - Micet, Paul

PY - 2007

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N2 - Assessment is a vital part of the learning process. But is it being done efficiently and consistently? The focus of assessment tasks is often on the task itself and its perceived effectiveness in relation to overall learning outcomes, rather than on the logistics of examining, marking and providing adequate and timely feedback. Good assessment strategies require a rubric and marking guide that are consistent with the requirements of the assessment item, are indicative measures of the students’ learning and are highly transparent. These need to be applied consistently across all students, yet a level of tolerance also needs to be factored in. Last, but by no means least, the process has to be done within the confines of strictly limited resources and within tight time frames. For units (subjects) involving large cohorts (200 students and upwards), the logistics can be daunting. Consistency in the application of marking criteria has to be questioned when the marking process is devolved to a number of tutors or examiners. The authors discuss some simple strategies that can be deployed to streamline the logistics by using simple and readily available personal computer applications (Microsoft Word an Excel) to semi-automate the repetitive and mundane aspects of the marking process, thereby producing a high level of control, higher levels of consistency, reduced time taken to complete the process and significantly shorten the time lag to aggregate and release marks. The strategies can be adopted to a variety of situations – numbers oriented assessments (such accounting exercises) or essay style assessments, whether submitted electronically or be paper based. The authors discuss experiences – the “pros and cons” - where the strategies have been deployed to significant advantage – in a cohort of a nominal 500 second year students and another involving 200 masters students. Users (examiners) reported reduced marker fatigue and frustration, whilst other users experienced “technical problems”. The strategies provided good audit trail and back backup ‘disaster’ recovery.

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M3 - Other chapter contribution

SN - 9781862953758

BT - Proceedings of the Second Innovation in Accounting and Corporate Governance Education Conference

A2 - Meyers, N. M.

A2 - Smith, B. N.

A2 - Bingham, S. A.

A2 - Shimeld, S. F.

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Blount Y, Micet P. Electronic mediated marking of student assessments: strategies and techniques to improve the efficiency and consistency in the marking process. In Meyers NM, Smith BN, Bingham SA, Shimeld SF, editors, Proceedings of the Second Innovation in Accounting and Corporate Governance Education Conference. Hobart: School of Accounting and Corporate Governance, University of Tasmania. 2007