Emotion-related explanations of the vowel variability in infant-directed speech

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

Abstract

Speech is inherently variable, and so is Infant-Directed Speech (IDS). IDS is also a highly emotional register. In two listenerrating studies of Dutch IDS, we explore emotion-related explanations for (Exp 1) and consequences of (Exp 2) the acoustic differences between IDS vowel tokens. Listeners rated IDS utterances on valence and energy (Exp 1) and on the perception of smiles and child-like speech (Exp 2). The predicted association between valence and formant frequencies was not found (Exp 1), but a higher second formant results in a more smiled and more child-like percept (Exp 2).
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Sixteenth Australasian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology
EditorsChristopher Carignan, Michael D. Tyler
Place of PublicationCanberra, ACT
PublisherAustralasian Speech Science and Technology Association (ASSTA)
Pages233-236
Number of pages4
Publication statusPublished - 2016
EventAustralasian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology (16th : 2016) - Parramatta, Australia
Duration: 6 Dec 20169 Dec 2016
Conference number: 16th

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Australasian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology
PublisherAustralasian Speech Science and Technology Association (ASSTA)
ISSN (Electronic)2207-1296

Conference

ConferenceAustralasian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology (16th : 2016)
Abbreviated titleSST2016
CountryAustralia
CityParramatta
Period6/12/169/12/16

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Benders, T. (2016). Emotion-related explanations of the vowel variability in infant-directed speech. In C. Carignan, & M. D. Tyler (Eds.), Proceedings of the Sixteenth Australasian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology (pp. 233-236). (Proceedings of the Australasian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology). Canberra, ACT: Australasian Speech Science and Technology Association (ASSTA).