English language and language-free detection of spatial processing disorders in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children

Kiri Mealings*, Harvey Dillon

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to compare speech reception thresholds in noise measured with the Listening in Spatialised Noise–Universal test (LiSN-U; which requires no English knowledge) with those measured from the relevant conditions of the LiSN–Sentences test (LiSN-S; a test requiring knowledge of English) in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children. A second aim was to compare the ability of the two tests to detect spatial processing disorder. Design: Participants completed audiometry, the LiSN-S, and the LiSN-U. Study sample: 90 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged six to 14 years tested in a school setting. Results: Strong correlations were found between speech reception thresholds in noise for the two tests. A moderate correlation was found between the difference scores that each test uses to detect spatial processing disorder. Consistent diagnoses of whether a child had spatial processing disorder or not on both tests were found for 72% of children. Conclusions: The moderate-to-strong relationships and agreement between diagnoses found for the LiSN-S and LiSN-U show promise for the LiSN-U being used as a tool to investigate spatial processing disorder in children, without requiring the test to use a language familiar to the children being tested.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Audiology
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 28 Feb 2020

Keywords

  • spatial processing
  • auditory processing disorder
  • speech perception
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children

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