Environmental requirements in the WTO: developmental challenges of the least developed countries with a particular reference to Bangladesh

Pradip Royhan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
11 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Environmental standards such as labelling, packaging and sanitary standards (often characterised as non-trade barriers or NTBs) are becoming an increasing concern amongst the international trading community. Historically such standards have burdened producers and exporters for developing economies where a drop in net exports may infringe on their ability to access markets of developed nations. Conversely, developed economies demand compliance with minimum environmental standards, often resulting in criticisms of ‘ecoimperialism’. The purpose of this paper is to examine the complex relationship between trade and the environment, with a particular emphasis upon the impact that international laws which regulate production methods has upon developing economies. This paper shall also canvass the developing economy of Bangladesh as a case study for this analysis.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-15
Number of pages15
JournalMacquarie Journal of International and Comparative Environmental Law
Volume9
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Bibliographical note

Publisher version archived with the permission of the Dean, Division of Law, Macquarie University, NSW, Australia. This copy is available for individual, non-commercial use. Permission to reprint/republish this version for other uses must be obtained from the publisher.

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