Epistemic climates for active citizenship: dialogically organised classrooms and children’s internal dialogue

Jo Lunn Brownlee*, Sue Walker, Eva Johansson, Laura Scholes, Mary Ryan

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    While the significance of children’s early learning experiences is recognised internationally, less is known about early learning for moral values and active citizenship. There is evidence to suggest that prejudicial behaviours can emerge in early childhood, yet there is little research to inform how to promote social inclusion and reduce exclusionary behaviours in young children. One promising line of research involves considering children’s reasoning about moral values for active citizenship. This chapter explores values education and children’s learning of moral values through the theoretical lens of epistemic beliefs. We argue that a focus on children’s beliefs about knowing and knowledge in the context of learning about moral values is best addressed in dialogically organised early years classrooms.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationValues education in early childhood settings
    Subtitle of host publicationconcepts, approaches and practices
    EditorsEva Johansson, Anette Emilson, Anna-Maija Puroila
    Place of PublicationCham
    PublisherSpringer
    Chapter5
    Pages69-87
    Number of pages19
    ISBN (Electronic)9783319755595, 9783030092641
    ISBN (Print)9783319755588
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2018

    Publication series

    NameInternational Perspectives on Early Childhood Education and Development
    Volume23
    ISSN (Print)2468-8746
    ISSN (Electronic)2468-8754

    Keywords

    • active citizenship
    • children’s epistemic beliefs
    • dialogically organised classrooms
    • early years education
    • reflexivity

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