Neuron-specific enolase as a predictor of death or poor neurological outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and targeted temperature management at 33°C and 36°C

Pascal Stammet*, Olivier Collignon, Christian Hassager, Matthew P. Wise, Jan Hovdenes, Anders Åneman, Janneke Horn, Yvan Devaux, David Erlinge, Jesper Kjaergaard, Yvan Gasche, Michael Wanscher, Tobias Cronberg, Hans Friberg, Jørn Wetterslev, Tommaso Pellis, Michael Kuiper, Georges Gilson, Niklas Nielsen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

149 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) is a widely-used biomarker for prognostication of neurological outcome after cardiac arrest, but the relevance of recommended cutoff values has been questioned due to the lack of a standardized methodology and uncertainties over the influence of temperature management. Objectives This study investigated the role of NSE as a prognostic marker of outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in a contemporary setting. Methods A total of 686 patients hospitalized after OHCA were randomized to targeted temperature management at either 33°C or 36°C. NSE levels were assessed in blood samples obtained 24, 48, and 72 h after return of spontaneous circulation. The primary outcome was neurological outcome at 6 months using the cerebral performance category score. Results NSE was a robust predictor of neurological outcome in a baseline variable-adjusted model, and target temperature did not significantly affect NSE values. Median NSE values were 18 ng/ml versus 35 ng/ml, 15 ng/ml versus 61 ng/ml, and 12 ng/ml versus 54 ng/ml for good versus poor outcome at 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively (p < 0.001). At 48 and 72 h, NSE predicted neurological outcome with areas under the receiver-operating curve of 0.85 and 0.86, respectively. High NSE cutoff values with false positive rates ≤5% and tight 95% confidence intervals were able to reliably predict outcome. Conclusions High, serial NSE values are strong predictors of poor outcome after OHCA. Targeted temperature management at 33°C or 36°C does not significantly affect NSE levels. (Target Temperature Management After Cardiac Arrest [TTM]; NCT01020916)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2104-2114
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume65
Issue number19
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 May 2015
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Correction can be found in Journal of the American College of Cardiology volume 66(8), p983, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2015.07.005

Keywords

  • biomarker
  • cerebral performance
  • neuroprognostication
  • prognosis

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