Estrogen signaling through estrogen receptor beta and g-protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 in human cerebral vascular endothelial cells: Implications for cerebral aneurysms

Jian Tu*, Nurul F. Jufri

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Little is known about estrogen receptors and their signaling mechanisms in human cerebral vascular endothelial cells, which is important for understanding cerebral aneurysm pathogenesis in menopausal and postmenopausal women. Estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) and G-protein-coupled receptor 1 (GPER1) were immunocytochemically identified in human cerebral vascular endothelial cells (HCVECs). ERβ was mainly located at the nuclei of the cells while GPER1 was located at the plasma membrane. Interaction events between 17β-estradiol and ERβ or GPER1 in HCVECs were evaluated by in situ proximity ligation assay. The number of interaction events between 17β-estradiol and ERβ was positively correlated with 17β-estradiol concentrations (r = 0.9614, P < 0.01). The interaction events between 17β-estradiol and GPER1 were dose responsive. Our data support HCVECs to serve as a suitable cellular model for studying cerebral aneurysm pathogenesis in menopausal and postmenopausal women. Subtypes of estrogen receptors and their signaling mechanisms identified in HCVECs could be applicable for developing estrogen-like compounds to specifically bind to a subtype of estrogen receptors with greater specific action on the cerebral arteries, without the estrogen-dependent side effects on the reproductive organs, to prevent cerebral aneurysm formation in menopausal and postmenopausal woman.

Original languageEnglish
Article number524324
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalBioMed Research International
Volume2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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