Evaluating cognitive competence

does eye movement behavior represent the missing piece of the puzzle?

Jemma M. Harris, Mark W. Wiggins

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Competence in cognitive skills such as situation assessment and decision-making is difficult to assess through the analysis of technical skills in isolation. The present study sought to test a new methodology to identify the cognitive performance of operators. Forty-one general aviation pilots completed a series of tasks in a simulated flight that were designed to trigger the application of either lower-order (monitoring) or higher-order (decision-making) cognitive skills. The results revealed that, in comparison to the lowerorder task, higher-order tasks (low oil pressure and right magneto fail) were associated with significantly higher mean subjective cognitive complexity scores, a significantly higher mean range of gaze movement, a significantly higher proportion of short fixation durations (<150 ms), and a significantly lower proportion of long fixation durations (>600 ms). These results are discussed in terms of developing an assessment tool for the application of higher and lower-order cognitive skills.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 52nd Annual Meeting
Subtitle of host publicationSeptember 22-26, 2008, New York City, NY
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherHuman Factors and Ergonomics Society
Pages2077-2081
Number of pages5
ISBN (Print)9781605606859
Publication statusPublished - 2008
Externally publishedYes
Event52nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2008 - New York, NY, United States
Duration: 22 Sep 200826 Sep 2008

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting
PublisherHuman Factors and Ergonomics Society
Number26
Volume52
ISSN (Print)1541-9312

Other

Other52nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2008
CountryUnited States
CityNew York, NY
Period22/09/0826/09/08

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  • Cite this

    Harris, J. M., & Wiggins, M. W. (2008). Evaluating cognitive competence: does eye movement behavior represent the missing piece of the puzzle? In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 52nd Annual Meeting: September 22-26, 2008, New York City, NY (pp. 2077-2081). (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting; Vol. 52, No. 26). New York: Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.