Evaluating the models and behaviour of 3D intelligent virtual animals in a predator-prey relationship

Deborah Richards, Michael J. Jacobson, John Porte, Charlotte Taylor, Meredith Taylor, Anne Newstead, Iwan Kelaiah, Nader Hanna

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper presents the intelligent virtual animals that inhabit Omosa, a virtual learning environment to help secondary school students learn how to conduct scientific inquiry and gain concepts from biology. Omosa supports multiple agents, including animals, plants, and human hunters, which live in groups of varying sizes and in a predator-prey relationship with other agent types (species). In this paper we present our generic agent architecture and the algorithms that drive all animals. We concentrate on two of our animals to present how different parameter values affect their movements and inter/intra-group interactions. Two evaluations studies are included: one to demonstrate the effect of different components of our architecture; another to provide domain expert validation of the animal behavior.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication11th International Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems 2012, AAMAS 2012: Innovative Applications Track
EditorsWiebe van der Hoek, Lin Padgham, Vincent Conitzer, Michael Winikoff
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Pages256-263
Number of pages8
Volume1
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Event11th International Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems 2012: Innovative Applications Track, AAMAS 2012 - Valencia, Spain
Duration: 4 Jun 20128 Jun 2012

Other

Other11th International Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems 2012: Innovative Applications Track, AAMAS 2012
CountrySpain
CityValencia
Period4/06/128/06/12

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