Evaluation of physically small p-phenylacetate-modified carbon electrodes against fouling during dopamine detection in vivo

Shaneel Chandra, Anthony D. Miller, Danny K Y Wong*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper, the effectiveness of anionic p-phenylacetate film was evaluated in protecting physically small conical-tip carbon electrodes (∼2 μm radius and ∼4 μm axial length) from fouling during dopamine detection in vivo. After characterising p-phenylacetate film-modified carbon electrodes in several redox systems in vitro, they were found to exhibit an 11% loss in dopamine oxidation signal over a 40-day storage period in ambient laboratory conditions, compared to over a 90% loss at bare carbon electrodes. In addition, by incubating in a synthetic laboratory solution containing the fouling reagents, 1.0% (v/v) caproic acid (a lipid), 0.1% (w/v) bovine serum albumin and 0.01% (w/v) cytochrome C (both are protein) and 0.002% (w/v) human fibrinopeptide B (a peptide), film-modified carbon electrodes showed a 29% reduction in the limit of detection and a 25% decrease in sensitivity for dopamine over 7 days, compared to undeterminable results arising from a severely degraded surface at bare carbon electrodes. During dopamine detection in vivo, 70-95% of the dopamine oxidation current remained after the first 40 min of the experiment, and at least 50% over the next 20 min. In contrast, constant degradation in the dopamine oxidation signal was observed at bare carbon electrodes throughout the experiment. An average electrode surface fouling rate of 0.54% min-1 was estimated at the p-phenylacetate film-modified carbon electrodes during the first 40 min of the experiments.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)225-231
Number of pages7
JournalElectrochimica Acta
Volume101
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Evaluation of physically small p-phenylacetate-modified carbon electrodes against fouling during dopamine detection in vivo'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this