Evertor muscle activity as a predictor of the mid-term outcome following treatment of the idiopathic and non-idiopathic clubfoot

Y. Gelfer, M. Dunkley, D. Jackson, J. Armstrong, C. Rafter, E. Parnell, D. M. Eastwood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous studies have identified clinical and demographic risk factors for recurrence in the treatment of idiopathic clubfoot (congenital talipes equinovarus). Evertor muscle activity is not usually considered amongst them. This study aimed to evaluate whether recurrence could be predicted by demographic, clinical and gait parameters. From a series of 103 children with clubfeet, 67 had completed a follow-up of two years: 41 male and 26 female, 38 with idiopathic and 29 with non-idiopathic deformities. The mean age was 3.2 years (2.1 to 6.3). Primary correction was obtained in all 38 children (100%) with an idiopathic deformity, and in 26 of 29 patients (90%) with a non-idiopathic deformity. Overall, 60 children (90%) complied with the abduction brace regime. At a mean follow-up of 31.4 months (24 to 62), recurrence was noted in six children (15.8%) in the idiopathic and 14 children (48.3%) in the non-idiopathic group. Significant correlation was found between poor evertor activity and recurrence in both groups. No statistically significant relationship was found between the rate of recurrence and the severity of the initial deformity, the age at the time of treatment, the number of casts required or the compliance with the brace. After correction of idiopathic and non-idiopathic clubfoot using the Ponseti method, only poor evertor muscle activity was statistically associated with recurrence. The identification of risk factors for recurrent deformity allows clinicians to anticipate problems and advocate early additional treatment to improve muscle balance around the ankle.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1264-1268
Number of pages5
JournalBone and Joint Journal
Volume96-B
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

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