Evidence-based practice in chiropractic practice: a survey of chiropractors' knowledge, skills, use of research literature and barriers to the use of research evidence

B. F. Walker, N. J. Stomski*, J. J. Hebert, S. D. French

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Scant research has been undertaken regarding chiropractors' skills and knowledge associated with evidence-based practice (EBP), and their perceived barriers to EBP. These issues appear to have been examined in only one small qualitative study and one small study of chiropractors holding orthopaedic diplomas. The lack of research in this area suggests that additional studies are warranted to develop a better understanding of factors that affect chiropractors' use of research evidence in clinical practice.

Methods: We used a modified online questionnaire that captured information regarding EBP skills and knowledge, and barriers to EBP. Its adaption was informed by the use of a content validity panel. The questionnaire was disseminated through email by Australian chiropractic professional organisations and the Chiropractic Board of Australia. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine univariate associations between responses to items measuring knowledge and skills with items measuring: age; years since registration; reading research literature; and use of research literature in clinical decision-making.

Results: 584 respondents returned questionnaires. About half of the respondents stated they had learned the foundations of EBP (56.6%) during their undergraduate training. Slightly more than two thirds of the respondents were confident in their ability to critically review literature (69.5%) and find relevant research to answer clinical questions (72.6%). The most common factors involved with reading more research, and increased use of research literature in clinical decision-making, were confidence in critical appraisal skills and confidence in finding relevant research literature. Conclusion Educational interventions should be implemented to enhance Australian chiropractors' fundamental EBP skills.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)286-295
Number of pages10
JournalComplementary Therapies in Medicine
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • chiropractic
  • complementary medicine
  • evidence-based practice
  • survey
  • Complementary medicine
  • Survey
  • Chiropractic
  • Evidence-based practice

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