Evidence of heterogeneous crustal origin for the Pan-African Mbengwi granitoids and the associated mafic intrusions (northwestern Cameroon, central Africa)

Benoît Joseph Mbassa*, Pierre Kamgang, Michel Grégoire, Emmanuel Njonfang, Mathieu Benoit, Zénon Itiga, Stéphanie Duchene, Moïse Bessong, Pauline Wonkwenmendam Nguet, Ntepe Nfomou

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Mbengwi plutonics consist of intermediate to felsic granitoids forming a continuous magmatic series from monzonite to granite and mafic intrusions. Their mineralogical composition consists of quartz, plagioclases, K-feldspars, biotite, muscovite, and amphibole. The accessory phase includes opaque minerals + titanite ± apatite ± zircon, while secondary minerals are pyrite, phengite, chlorite, epidote, and rarely calcite. These plutonics are assigned high-K calc-alkaline to shoshonitic series, metaluminous to weakly peraluminous and mostly belong to an I-type suite (A/CNK = 0.63-1.2). They are typically post-collisional, with a subduction signature probably being inherited from their protoliths emplaced during the subduction phase. The Sr and Nd isotopic data evidence that these plutonics result from melting of the lower continental crust with variable contribution of the oceanic crust. Their geochemical features are similar to those of western Cameroon granitoids related to the Pan-African D1 event in Cameroon.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)116-126
Number of pages11
JournalComptes Rendus - Geoscience
Volume348
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cameroon
  • High-K calc-alkaline plutonics
  • Lower continental crust
  • Metaluminous to weakly peraluminous
  • Subduction signature
  • Type I

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