Executive functioning and theory of mind in euthymic bipolar disorder

Amanda L. Olley, Gin S. Malhi, Jennifer Bachelor, Catherine M. Cahill, Philip B. Mitchell, Michael Berk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: To examine the nature of executive deficits in euthymic patients with bipolar disorder (BD). Methods: Fifteen euthymic BD patients and 13 controls were administered a battery of executive tasks including verbal fluency, Stroop, Theory of Mind (ToM) tests and selected subtests from the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB). Self-report and clinician ratings of mood and social and occupational functioning were also obtained. Results: There were no significant differences between BD patients and controls on the primary measures of the following executive tasks: verbal fluency, attentional set-shifting, problem solving or planning. On secondary measures of speed, BD patients were slower to complete the first trial of the Stroop task (p = 0.001). Patients with BD committed more errors across all secondary measures. Patients performed poorly when compared with controls on tests of verbal ToM (p = 0.02), and although they performed non-verbal ToM tasks at a level comparable to controls (p = 0.60), they were slower to initiate a response (p = 0.006). ToM was not significantly correlated with any measure of social and occupational functioning; however it correlated with the achievement scores of the CANTAB Stockings of Cambridge task (Pearson's r = 0.68, p < 0.01). Conclusions: Deficits found in euthymic bipolar patients suggest fronto-subcortical pathway dysfunction. This is consistent with other neuropsychological and neuroimaging research that points to a trait deficit in BD. Further investigation is necessary perhaps using more real-world tests.

LanguageEnglish
Pages43-52
Number of pages10
JournalBipolar Disorders, Supplement
Volume7
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

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Theory of Mind
Bipolar Disorder
Neuropsychological Tests
Neuroimaging
Self Report
Research

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Olley, Amanda L. ; Malhi, Gin S. ; Bachelor, Jennifer ; Cahill, Catherine M. ; Mitchell, Philip B. ; Berk, Michael. / Executive functioning and theory of mind in euthymic bipolar disorder. In: Bipolar Disorders, Supplement. 2005 ; Vol. 7, No. 5. pp. 43-52.
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Executive functioning and theory of mind in euthymic bipolar disorder. / Olley, Amanda L.; Malhi, Gin S.; Bachelor, Jennifer; Cahill, Catherine M.; Mitchell, Philip B.; Berk, Michael.

In: Bipolar Disorders, Supplement, Vol. 7, No. 5, 2005, p. 43-52.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Berk, Michael

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