Exercise-based rehabilitation for injured workers: Programme efficacy and identification of factors predicting programme completion and outcome

Dianna T. Kenny*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    11 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    A sample of 355 injured workers presenting to a tertiary referral agency for supervised physical activity programmes were assessed for programme completion and changes in work status at the conclusion of the programme. Seventy-five percent of the sample comprised long-term (i.e. greater than six months) injured workers, of whom 45% were unemployed at the commencement of the programme. There was a 15% dropout rate and 49% of completers improved their work status at the end of the programme. A series of stepwise logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify predictors of dropout and improved work status. Joint pathology was the only predictor of dropout. Preprogramme work status, referral source, intervertebral pathology, and time between injury and commencement of the programme predicted post-programme work status. Those workers who were employed, referred by sources other than rehabilitation providers, such as doctors, employers or insurers, did not have a diagnosis including intervertebral pathology and who began their programmes within six months of injury were more likely to improve their work status at the conclusion of the programme. Other factors including age, gender, occupation, insurer category, location of injury (i.e. lumbar or other), and neurological signs predicted neither programme completion nor change in work status.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)7-17
    Number of pages11
    JournalInternational Journal of Rehabilitation Research
    Volume23
    Issue number1
    Publication statusPublished - 2000

    Keywords

    • Active rehabilitation
    • Exercise
    • Injured workers
    • Prediction
    • Programme outcome

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