Exploring inter-relationships among human-tiger conflicts, human capital outcomes for forest dependent communities and the sustainability of tiger habitats

Ram Ranjan*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    I develop a bio-economic model to analyse how human-tiger conflicts (HTCs) impact on forest dependent community members’ decisions to invest in human capital via education. I further explore the linkages between human capital outcomes and future sustainability of the forests as well as of the tiger populations. Results suggest that the risk of human mortality arising from HTCs could play a crucial role in determining human capital investment decisions. Specifically, lower HTC risk delays efforts to increase human capital via education. Furthermore, when the chances of finding employment are not very high, or when expected income in the skilled sector is not very high, communities delay human capital accumulation and prolong reliance on forest-based livelihoods, thereby increasing HTC risks. Low-growth forests can also promote early human capital investments. Finally, the manner in which HTC risks are affected by community actions can also influence their livelihood-based decisions.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)617-631
    Number of pages15
    JournalHuman Ecology
    Volume44
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2016

    Keywords

    • Bangladesh
    • forest-based livelihoods
    • forestry dependent communities
    • human capital
    • human tiger conflicts
    • India
    • sundarbans forests
    • tiger conservation

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