Exploring music-syntactic processing and language-syntactic processing in congenital amusia using MEG and EEG

Yanan Sun, Xuejing Lu, Hao Tam Ho, Blake Johnson, William Forde Thompson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The current study is investigating music-syntactic processing and language-syntactic processing in congenital amusia using electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG). For the music experiment, 80 western five-note-melodies were created with a piano timbre. They were randomly mixed with the same 80 melodies ending with an out-of-key note. Another 40 melodies were included that contain one note with a deviant instrument (i.e. guitar). Participants were asked to detect these timbre-deviants. For the language experiment, five word English sentences were presented orally. The final word was either syntactically incorrect, semantically incongruent, or syntactically / semantically ‘correct’. To ensure they attended to the stimuli, participants were occasionally required to answer questions on randomly selected trials related to the sentence they just heard. Brain activity was recorded using concurrent 160-channel MEG and 64-channel EEG. Preliminary EEG results showed that syntactic violations in both music and language elicited similar brain responses in normal controls (ERAN and N5 for the music task and ELAN and N400 for the language task); Amusics showed deficits to some extent in these event-related brain responses in both music and language tasks.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Ninth Triennial Conference of the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music
EditorsJane Ginsborg, Alexandra Lamont, Michelle Phillips, Stephanie Bramley
Place of PublicationManchester, UK
PublisherRoyal Northern College of Music
Pages765-770
Number of pages6
Publication statusPublished - 2015
EventTriennial Conference of the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music (9th : 2015) - Manchester, UK
Duration: 17 Aug 201522 Aug 2015

Conference

ConferenceTriennial Conference of the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music (9th : 2015)
CityManchester, UK
Period17/08/1522/08/15

Fingerprint

Magnetoencephalography
Music
Electroencephalography
Language
Brain
Tune Deafness

Cite this

Sun, Y., Lu, X., Ho, H. T., Johnson, B., & Thompson, W. F. (2015). Exploring music-syntactic processing and language-syntactic processing in congenital amusia using MEG and EEG. In J. Ginsborg, A. Lamont, M. Phillips, & S. Bramley (Eds.), Proceedings of the Ninth Triennial Conference of the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music (pp. 765-770). Manchester, UK: Royal Northern College of Music.
Sun, Yanan ; Lu, Xuejing ; Ho, Hao Tam ; Johnson, Blake ; Thompson, William Forde. / Exploring music-syntactic processing and language-syntactic processing in congenital amusia using MEG and EEG. Proceedings of the Ninth Triennial Conference of the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music. editor / Jane Ginsborg ; Alexandra Lamont ; Michelle Phillips ; Stephanie Bramley. Manchester, UK : Royal Northern College of Music, 2015. pp. 765-770
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title = "Exploring music-syntactic processing and language-syntactic processing in congenital amusia using MEG and EEG",
abstract = "The current study is investigating music-syntactic processing and language-syntactic processing in congenital amusia using electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG). For the music experiment, 80 western five-note-melodies were created with a piano timbre. They were randomly mixed with the same 80 melodies ending with an out-of-key note. Another 40 melodies were included that contain one note with a deviant instrument (i.e. guitar). Participants were asked to detect these timbre-deviants. For the language experiment, five word English sentences were presented orally. The final word was either syntactically incorrect, semantically incongruent, or syntactically / semantically ‘correct’. To ensure they attended to the stimuli, participants were occasionally required to answer questions on randomly selected trials related to the sentence they just heard. Brain activity was recorded using concurrent 160-channel MEG and 64-channel EEG. Preliminary EEG results showed that syntactic violations in both music and language elicited similar brain responses in normal controls (ERAN and N5 for the music task and ELAN and N400 for the language task); Amusics showed deficits to some extent in these event-related brain responses in both music and language tasks.",
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Sun, Y, Lu, X, Ho, HT, Johnson, B & Thompson, WF 2015, Exploring music-syntactic processing and language-syntactic processing in congenital amusia using MEG and EEG. in J Ginsborg, A Lamont, M Phillips & S Bramley (eds), Proceedings of the Ninth Triennial Conference of the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music. Royal Northern College of Music, Manchester, UK, pp. 765-770, Triennial Conference of the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music (9th : 2015), Manchester, UK, 17/08/15.

Exploring music-syntactic processing and language-syntactic processing in congenital amusia using MEG and EEG. / Sun, Yanan; Lu, Xuejing; Ho, Hao Tam; Johnson, Blake; Thompson, William Forde.

Proceedings of the Ninth Triennial Conference of the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music. ed. / Jane Ginsborg; Alexandra Lamont; Michelle Phillips; Stephanie Bramley. Manchester, UK : Royal Northern College of Music, 2015. p. 765-770.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionResearchpeer-review

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AB - The current study is investigating music-syntactic processing and language-syntactic processing in congenital amusia using electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG). For the music experiment, 80 western five-note-melodies were created with a piano timbre. They were randomly mixed with the same 80 melodies ending with an out-of-key note. Another 40 melodies were included that contain one note with a deviant instrument (i.e. guitar). Participants were asked to detect these timbre-deviants. For the language experiment, five word English sentences were presented orally. The final word was either syntactically incorrect, semantically incongruent, or syntactically / semantically ‘correct’. To ensure they attended to the stimuli, participants were occasionally required to answer questions on randomly selected trials related to the sentence they just heard. Brain activity was recorded using concurrent 160-channel MEG and 64-channel EEG. Preliminary EEG results showed that syntactic violations in both music and language elicited similar brain responses in normal controls (ERAN and N5 for the music task and ELAN and N400 for the language task); Amusics showed deficits to some extent in these event-related brain responses in both music and language tasks.

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Sun Y, Lu X, Ho HT, Johnson B, Thompson WF. Exploring music-syntactic processing and language-syntactic processing in congenital amusia using MEG and EEG. In Ginsborg J, Lamont A, Phillips M, Bramley S, editors, Proceedings of the Ninth Triennial Conference of the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music. Manchester, UK: Royal Northern College of Music. 2015. p. 765-770