Exploring the role of cognitive reserve in early-onset dementia

Sarah E. Fairjones, Elizabeth J. Vuletich, Carmela Pestell, Peter K. Panegyres*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: Cognitive reserve (CR) is important in protecting the brain from injury and has not been investigated in people with early-onset dementia (EOD). Methods: A retrospective case control study of 44 patients with dementia onset prior to 65 years of age: Alzheimer's disease (AD) = 23; frontotemporal dementia (FTD) = 21. Groups were matched for age, education, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), premorbid IQ, sex and APOE epsilon 4 genotype. Years of formal education were used as a marker of CR. Relationships between education and neuropsychological data was examined using linear regression analyses. Results: There were no demographic differences between the AD and FTD groups. Significant associations were found between education and attention, working memory and visuospatial abilities. There was an effect of CR for the EOD group and selective effects in FTD and AD. Conclusion: Our findings suggest CR is operational in patients with FTD and AD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)139-144
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and other Dementias
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • early-onset dementia
  • Alzheimer's disease
  • frontotemporal dementia
  • cognitive reserve
  • neuropsychological assessment
  • ALZHEIMERS-DISEASE
  • EDUCATION
  • DECLINE
  • BRAIN
  • ASSOCIATION
  • HYPOTHESIS
  • DIAGNOSIS
  • CRITERIA

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