Fabrication of gratings in mid-infrared compatible fibres via femtosecond laser direct inscription

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

We report on research into the fabrication of different types of gratings into optical fibres that are transparent at mid-infrared wavelengths. In particular, we focus on direct femtosecond laser inscription of fibre-Bragg gratings with parallel as well as with tilted grating planes into zirconium and indium fluoride fibres. It is shown that post-annealing of the gratings can lead to an increase or decrease in reflectivity depending on the fabrication method and that even a relatively low concentration of rare-earth ions that are present in active fibres can have a big influence on the inscription process.Further, the feasibility investigating the physical mechanisms that underpin the induced refractive index modulation by utilising argon-beam cross-sectional polishing of the inscribed fibres followed by spatially resolved Raman microscopy and electron probe microanalysis, is discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationICTON 2019
Subtitle of host publication21st International Conference on Transparent Optical Networks
EditorsMarek Jaworski, Marian Marciniak
Place of PublicationPiscataway, NJ
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
Pages1-4
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9781728127798
ISBN (Print)9781728127804
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2019
Event21st International Conference on Transparent Optical Networks, ICTON 2019 - Angers, France
Duration: 9 Jul 201913 Jul 2019

Conference

Conference21st International Conference on Transparent Optical Networks, ICTON 2019
CountryFrance
CityAngers
Period9/07/1913/07/19

Keywords

  • Femtosecond-laser inscription
  • Fibre Bragg gratings
  • Fluoride fibres
  • Mid-infrared fibres
  • Tilted fibre Bragg gratings

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