Facile patterning of silver nanowires with controlled polarities via inkjet-assisted manipulation of interface adhesion

Tao Wan*, Peiyuan Guan, Xinwei Guan, Long Hu, Tom Wu, Claudio Cazorla, Dewei Chu

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Facile patterning technologies of silver nanowires (AgNWs) with low-cost, high-resolution, designable, scalable, substrate-independent, and transferable characteristics are highly desired. However, it remains a grand challenge for any material processing method to fulfil all desirable features. Herein, a new patterning method is introduced by combining inkjet printing with adhesion manipulation of substrate interfaces. Both positive and negative patterns (i.e., AgNW grid and rectangular patterns) have been simultaneously achieved, and the pattern polarity can be reversed through adhesion modification with judiciously selected supporting layers. The electrical performance of the AgNW grids depends on the AgNW interlocking structure, manifesting a strong structure-property correlation. High-resolution and complex AgNW patterns with line width and spacing as small as 10 μm have been demonstrated through selective deposition of poly(methyl methacrylate) layers. In addition, customized AgNW patterns, such as logos and words, can be fabricated onto A4-size samples and subsequently transferred to targeted substrates, including Si wafers, a curved glass vial, and a beaker. This reported inkjet-assisted process therefore offers a new effective route to manipulate AgNWs for advanced device applications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)34086-34094
Number of pages9
JournalACS Applied Materials and Interfaces
Volume12
Issue number30
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Jul 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • silver nanowires
  • patterning
  • polarities
  • inkjet printing
  • adhesion manipulation

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