Factors related to attitudes toward diversity in Australia, Malaysia, and Puerto Rico

Jac Brown, Aida L. Jiménez, Dharshika Sabanathan, Siraje Sekamanya, Michael Hough, Jeanna Sutton, Jose Rodríguez, Cynthia García Coll

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

In this study, we tested social identity complexity theory (Roccas & Brewer, 2002) in relation to attitudes toward diversity and the associated variables of patriotism, nationalism, religiosity, aggression, and sense of self (well-being) in a cross-cultural study of 398 Malaysian, 239 Australian, and 201 Puerto Rican students. Puerto Ricans reported the most positive attitudes toward diversity, followed by Australians, and finally Malaysians. For Puerto Ricans, pro-diversity attitudes were predicted by a positive correlation with constructive patriotism and a negative correlation with blind patriotism. For Australians, pro-diversity attitudes were predicted by a positive association with constructive patriotism, a negative association with traditional nationalism, and a negative association with physical aggression. For Malaysians, pro-diversity attitudes were predicted by positive relationships with all of the following variables: constructive patriotism, traditional nationalism, verbal aggression, hostility, and the need to bolster self through idealizing others. These results support social identity complexity theory and partially support associated predictions for Australians, Puerto Ricans, and some of the predictions for Malaysians. The results are explained in terms of local cultural contexts that may not easily be understood by a simple understanding of the variables that were measured.

LanguageEnglish
Pages475-493
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment
Volume28
Issue number4
Early online date9 Feb 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 May 2018

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Puerto Rico
patriotism
Malaysia
aggression
nationalism
cultural studies
well-being
student

Keywords

  • diversity
  • culture
  • religion
  • nationalism
  • aggression

Cite this

Brown, Jac ; Jiménez, Aida L. ; Sabanathan, Dharshika ; Sekamanya, Siraje ; Hough, Michael ; Sutton, Jeanna ; Rodríguez, Jose ; García Coll, Cynthia. / Factors related to attitudes toward diversity in Australia, Malaysia, and Puerto Rico. In: Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment. 2018 ; Vol. 28, No. 4. pp. 475-493.
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Brown, J, Jiménez, AL, Sabanathan, D, Sekamanya, S, Hough, M, Sutton, J, Rodríguez, J & García Coll, C 2018, 'Factors related to attitudes toward diversity in Australia, Malaysia, and Puerto Rico', Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment, vol. 28, no. 4, pp. 475-493. https://doi.org/10.1080/10911359.2018.1428137

Factors related to attitudes toward diversity in Australia, Malaysia, and Puerto Rico. / Brown, Jac; Jiménez, Aida L.; Sabanathan, Dharshika; Sekamanya, Siraje; Hough, Michael; Sutton, Jeanna; Rodríguez, Jose; García Coll, Cynthia.

In: Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment, Vol. 28, No. 4, 19.05.2018, p. 475-493.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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