Family caregiving for older Aboriginal people in urban Australia: Disclosing worlds of meaning in the dementia experience

Rachelle Arkles*, Claire Jankelson, Kylie Radford, Lisa Jackson Pulver

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dementia in Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population is an area of significant health and community concern. In this article, we use a hermeneutic mode of interpretation to deepen understanding of experience and meaning in dementia for family carers of older Aboriginal people in urban Australia. Specifically, we draw from the hermeneutic concept of “world disclosure” to illuminate the dementia experience in three ways: through an artwork of the brain and dementia; through concrete description of the lived relation of caregiving; and through an epochal perspective on the significance of contemporary caregiving in dementia. Using narrative and visual knowledge, this three-fold approach brings to the forefront the importance of ontological and existential meanings which resonate for Aboriginal families in the dementia caregiving experience.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)397-415
Number of pages19
JournalDementia
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2020

Keywords

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander carers
  • Aboriginal health and ageing
  • ageing
  • carers
  • dementia
  • dementia caregiving experiences
  • existential
  • hermeneutic

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