Family conflict and child adjustment: Evidence for a cognitive-contextual model of intergenerational transmission

Mark R. Dadds*, Erin Atkinson, Cynthia Turner, G. John Blums, Bernice Lendich

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

103 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Three cohorts of 10-to 14-year-old adolescents were sampled to obtain perceptions of their parents' conflict-resolution styles, their own conflict-resolution styles, and their behavioral adjustment, to test J. H. Grych and F. D. Fincham's (1990) cognitive-contextual model of the relationship of marital conflict to child adjustment. As found previously, boys and girls were not exposed to different levels or types of interparental conflict, although boys tended to blame themselves more. Adolescents' reports of their own conflict-resolution styles with siblings were clearly related to level and types of their more general adjustment levels. A series of regressions supported Grych and Fincham's model for internalizing problems (and avoidant resolution style) in adolescents; only minimal support was found with externalizing problems (and attacking resolution style). Gender-specific patterns of intergenerational transmission of resolution styles were found and are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)194-208
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Family Psychology
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1999
Externally publishedYes

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