Fault-lines in temporary migration schemes: the case of Australia and the legacies of settler-colonial mentalities in the exploitation of temporary non-citizens

Claudia Tazreiter, Andrew Burridge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

We evaluate the complexity of temporary migration schemes in contrast to the longstanding approach to immigration as a key aspect of nation-building in settler societies. Until the early 1990s, predominantly one-way, permanent immigration schemes were preferred in settler societies such as Australia. In an increasingly fluid global context, temporary migrants are more susceptible to forms of abuse and exploitation in a host society, with fewer forms of redress due to their status as non-citizens and non-permanent residents. Taking a specific focus upon Australia, we contextualize the experiences of temporary migrants both prior to and under the conditions of COVID-19. Our key argument is that temporary migration schemes are organised and structured not only to favour states, as well as employers and businesses, but that the stripping back of rights to those who enter these schemes is a deliberative aspect of the state approach.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)85-92
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Migration
Volume60
Issue number4
Early online date19 May 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2022

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author(s) 2022. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

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