Femtosecond direct written waveguides in Bismuth Germanate

Christopher Miese*, Michael J. Withford, Alex Fuerbach

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

Abstract

Bismuth germanate (Bi4Ge3O12) BGO is an interesting material for a wide range of optical sensing applications. The high electro-optic coefficient makes BGO suitable for high voltage and field sensing applications with high accuracy [1]. Further, single crystals are used as scintillator in combination with photo multiplier tubes or avalanche photodiodes. Arrays of these scintillator devices are used for positron emission tomography (PET), a common medical imaging system. However, the size of crystals arrays limits the resolution and makes the system expensive. To fully enhance the potential of this material in integrated optical circuits the fabrication of buried waveguides by ion implantation has been discussed [2]. The highly flexible technique of optical waveguide writing by tightly focused femtosecond laser pulses is a promising alternative; however, the inscription of positive index changes in crystals is difficult due to the crystal lattice.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2011 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics Europe and 12th European Quantum Electronics Conference, CLEO EUROPE/EQEC 2011
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
Pages1-1
Number of pages1
ISBN (Electronic)9781457705328
ISBN (Print)9781457705335
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Event2011 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics Europe and 12th European Quantum Electronics Conference, CLEO EUROPE/EQEC 2011 - Munich, Germany
Duration: 22 May 201126 May 2011

Other

Other2011 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics Europe and 12th European Quantum Electronics Conference, CLEO EUROPE/EQEC 2011
CountryGermany
CityMunich
Period22/05/1126/05/11

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