Fields of vision

art and astronomy

Leonard Janiszewski (Other), Rhonda Davis (Other), Kate Hargraves (Other), Quentin Parker (Other)

Research output: Non-traditional research outputExhibition

Abstract

An exhibition bringing together art works of diverse mediums that embrace and investigate the historical and contemporary link between art and the science of astronomy. A Macquarie University Art Gallery Exhibition, 18 July – 29 August 2014.

The beguiling known, unknown and unknowable wonderment and magnitude of the astronomical cosmos and our ever expanding human capacity to capture its beauty and majesty have been a muse to artists and astronomers across the ages. Through their creative explorations and analytical considered observations, human thought has navigated passages of time and space beyond our own earth to seek both identity and self-meaning. This exhibition marries the diverse and captivating 'fields of vision' that inspire, entrall and mystify human perceptions and synergies between art and astronomy. It has been specially scheduled and designed to celebrate the hosting by Macquarie University of the Annual meeting of the Astronomical Society of Australia.

The exhibition has been developed in partnership with the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Macquarie University, the MQ Research Centre for Astronomy, Astrophysics and Astrophotonics (MQAAAstro) after original discussions between Quentin Parker, Rhonda Davis and Leonard Janiszewski.

Artists include: Giles Alexander, Bronwyn Bancroft, Stephen Copland, Mark Davis, Paula Dawson, Rhonda Dee, Julie Dowling, Frank Hinder, Mike Kitching, Andrew Nott and Vernon Treweeke.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Keywords

  • Fine Arts
  • astronomy
  • Curation
  • Exhibition

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    Janiszewski, L. (Other), Davis, R. (Other), Hargraves, K. (Other), & Parker, Q. (Other). (2014). Fields of vision: art and astronomy. Exhibition