Financial cost of lymphedema borne by women with breast cancer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Our study examines the financial cost of lymphedema following a diagnosis of breast cancer and addresses a significant knowledge gap regarding the additional impact of lymphedema on breast cancer survivors. Methods: An online national survey was conducted with 361 women who had either breast cancer without lymphedema (BC) (group 1, n = 209) or breast cancer with lymphedema (BC+LE) (group 2, n = 152). Participant recruitment was supported by the Breast Cancer Network Australia and the Australasian Lymphology Association. Results: Both breast cancer and lymphedema result in significant out-of-pocket financial costs borne by women. Of patients with BC+LE, 80% indicated that their breast cancer diagnosis had affected them financially compared with 67% in the BC group (P < .020). For patients with lymphedema, over half (56%) indicated that this specific additional diagnosis to their breast cancer affected them financially and that costs increased with lymphedema severity. The cost of compression garments formed a large proportion of these costs (40.1%). The average number of attendances to a therapist each year was 5.8 (range, 0-45). Twenty-five patients (16.4%) had an episode of cellulitis in the past year. The incidence of cellulitis was 7.7% in 91 patients with subclinical or mild lymphedema compared with 29.5% of 61 patients with more extensive lymphedema (P < .001). The average out-of-pocket financial cost of lymphedema care borne by women was A$977 per annum, ranging from A$207 for subclinical lymphedema to over A$1400 for moderate or severe lymphedema. Conclusions: This study identifies an additional detrimental effect of lymphedema on women in terms of financial costs.

LanguageEnglish
Pages849-855
Number of pages7
JournalPsycho-Oncology
Volume26
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2017

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Lymphedema
Breast Neoplasms
Costs and Cost Analysis
Cellulitis
Health Expenditures
Clothing
Survivors
Breast Cancer Lymphedema
Incidence

Keywords

  • cancer
  • cellulitis
  • cost
  • lymphedema
  • oncology

Cite this

@article{494022c3a4ba4f76b09fac9bf4c626a0,
title = "Financial cost of lymphedema borne by women with breast cancer",
abstract = "Objective: Our study examines the financial cost of lymphedema following a diagnosis of breast cancer and addresses a significant knowledge gap regarding the additional impact of lymphedema on breast cancer survivors. Methods: An online national survey was conducted with 361 women who had either breast cancer without lymphedema (BC) (group 1, n = 209) or breast cancer with lymphedema (BC+LE) (group 2, n = 152). Participant recruitment was supported by the Breast Cancer Network Australia and the Australasian Lymphology Association. Results: Both breast cancer and lymphedema result in significant out-of-pocket financial costs borne by women. Of patients with BC+LE, 80{\%} indicated that their breast cancer diagnosis had affected them financially compared with 67{\%} in the BC group (P < .020). For patients with lymphedema, over half (56{\%}) indicated that this specific additional diagnosis to their breast cancer affected them financially and that costs increased with lymphedema severity. The cost of compression garments formed a large proportion of these costs (40.1{\%}). The average number of attendances to a therapist each year was 5.8 (range, 0-45). Twenty-five patients (16.4{\%}) had an episode of cellulitis in the past year. The incidence of cellulitis was 7.7{\%} in 91 patients with subclinical or mild lymphedema compared with 29.5{\%} of 61 patients with more extensive lymphedema (P < .001). The average out-of-pocket financial cost of lymphedema care borne by women was A$977 per annum, ranging from A$207 for subclinical lymphedema to over A$1400 for moderate or severe lymphedema. Conclusions: This study identifies an additional detrimental effect of lymphedema on women in terms of financial costs.",
keywords = "cancer, cellulitis, cost, lymphedema, oncology",
author = "John Boyages and Ying Xu and Senia Kalfa and Louise Koelmeyer and Bonny Parkinson and Helen Mackie and Hector Viveros and Paul Gollan and Lucy Taksa",
year = "2017",
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language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "849--855",
journal = "Psycho‐Oncology",
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Financial cost of lymphedema borne by women with breast cancer. / Boyages, John; Xu, Ying; Kalfa, Senia; Koelmeyer, Louise; Parkinson, Bonny; Mackie, Helen; Viveros, Hector; Gollan, Paul; Taksa, Lucy.

In: Psycho-Oncology, Vol. 26, No. 6, 06.2017, p. 849-855.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Financial cost of lymphedema borne by women with breast cancer

AU - Boyages, John

AU - Xu, Ying

AU - Kalfa, Senia

AU - Koelmeyer, Louise

AU - Parkinson, Bonny

AU - Mackie, Helen

AU - Viveros, Hector

AU - Gollan, Paul

AU - Taksa, Lucy

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N2 - Objective: Our study examines the financial cost of lymphedema following a diagnosis of breast cancer and addresses a significant knowledge gap regarding the additional impact of lymphedema on breast cancer survivors. Methods: An online national survey was conducted with 361 women who had either breast cancer without lymphedema (BC) (group 1, n = 209) or breast cancer with lymphedema (BC+LE) (group 2, n = 152). Participant recruitment was supported by the Breast Cancer Network Australia and the Australasian Lymphology Association. Results: Both breast cancer and lymphedema result in significant out-of-pocket financial costs borne by women. Of patients with BC+LE, 80% indicated that their breast cancer diagnosis had affected them financially compared with 67% in the BC group (P < .020). For patients with lymphedema, over half (56%) indicated that this specific additional diagnosis to their breast cancer affected them financially and that costs increased with lymphedema severity. The cost of compression garments formed a large proportion of these costs (40.1%). The average number of attendances to a therapist each year was 5.8 (range, 0-45). Twenty-five patients (16.4%) had an episode of cellulitis in the past year. The incidence of cellulitis was 7.7% in 91 patients with subclinical or mild lymphedema compared with 29.5% of 61 patients with more extensive lymphedema (P < .001). The average out-of-pocket financial cost of lymphedema care borne by women was A$977 per annum, ranging from A$207 for subclinical lymphedema to over A$1400 for moderate or severe lymphedema. Conclusions: This study identifies an additional detrimental effect of lymphedema on women in terms of financial costs.

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KW - cellulitis

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KW - oncology

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