Financial literacy, financial judgement, and retirement self-efficacy of older trustees of self-managed superannuation funds

Joanne K. Earl*, Paul Gerrans, Anthony Asher, Julia Woodside

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigate relationships between retirement self-efficacy, financial literacy and financial judgement across a sample of older trustees of self-managed superannuation funds (SMSFs). Aside from demographic factors, we explore self-rated dementia behaviours, general mental ability, mastery and risk tolerance. An increasing number of older people are controlling significant assets, particularly those who elect to become self-managed superannuation fund trustees. The ageing population, including self-managed superannuation fund trustees, is susceptible to cognitive decline with advancing age. We find that cognitive ability and self-rated behavioural dementia symptoms both relate to financial literacy. Variance in retirement self-efficacy was explained by age, cognitive ability, financial literacy, mastery and self-rated behavioural dementia symptoms. Those reporting dementia symptoms appear more vulnerable to making poor financial judgements. Findings have important implications for financial literacy interventions and the monitoring of on-going cognitive decline.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)435-458
Number of pages24
JournalAustralian Journal of Management
Volume40
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Aug 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • ageing
  • cognitive ability
  • dementia
  • financial decision-making
  • financial literacy
  • retirement savings

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