Five-year observational study of Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural pain management when offered as routine care by an online therapy clinic

Heather D. Hadjistavropoulos*, Vanessa Peynenburg, David Thiessen, Luke H. Schneider, Marcie Nugent, Andrew Wilhelms, Eyal Karin, Nickolai Titov, Blake F. Dear

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural pain management programmes (PMPs) are effective, but less is known about their use outside of research trials. Five years of data from offering the Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural PMP in an online therapy clinic was examined to assess effectiveness, acceptability and predictors of outcomes. 

Methods: Patients (N = 293) were offered a previously validated 8-week Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural PMP and administered measures at pre-treatment, post-treatment and 3 months. 

Results: There was growth in demand for an Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural PMP over time (n = 64 first year to n = 133 fifth year). Moderate-to-large improvements on depression (post-treatment 35% reduction; 3-month 41% reduction) and anxiety (post-treatment 37% reduction; 3-month 41% reduction), and small-to-moderate improvements on disability (post-treatment 19% reduction; 3-month 20% reduction) were found. Lesson completion and satisfaction were high. Lower pain acceptance, lower pain self-efficacy and higher pain intensity were associated with lower improvements on depression, anxiety and disability. 

Conclusions: This longitudinal observational study provides support for Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural PMPs when offered as routine care by an online therapy clinic. 

Significance: This 5-year observational study provides support for Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural pain management programs (PMPs) offered as routine care in an online therapy clinic. Interest in the service grew over 5 years. Outcomes, engagement and satisfaction were strong. Higher pain acceptance, pain self-efficacy and lower pain severity were associated with greater post-treatment improvements on depression, anxiety and disability.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)390-404
Number of pages15
JournalEuropean Journal of Pain (United Kingdom)
Volume26
Issue number2
Early online date30 Sep 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 30 Sep 2021

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author(s) 2021. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

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