Fluorescent nanodiamonds for biological applications

J. M. Say*, C. Bradac, C. Van Vreden, C. Hill, D. Reilly, N. King, B. Herbert, L. Brown, J. R. Rabeau

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

Abstract

Biomedical imaging often involves the use of fluorophores, bright optical labels which enable observation of objects which are otherwise invisible. Conventional fluorophores include fluorescein, rhodamine, fluorescent proteins and quantum dots; however, often these are limited by cytotoxicity, pH sensitivities, brightness or photo bleaching/blinking [1]. Colour centres in nanodiamonds have many properties which make them attractive for biological applications including their chemical and physical stability, biocompatibility, easy surface modification and their optical and magnetic spin properties.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the International Quantum Electronics Conference and Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics Pacific Rim 2011
Place of PublicationPiscataway, NJ
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
Pages1708-1710
Number of pages3
ISBN (Electronic)9780977565788, 9781457719400
ISBN (Print)9781457719394
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011
EventInternational Quantum Electronics Conference and Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics Pacific Rim - 2011 - Sydney, NSW, Australia
Duration: 28 Aug 20111 Sep 2011

Other

OtherInternational Quantum Electronics Conference and Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics Pacific Rim - 2011
CountryAustralia
CitySydney, NSW
Period28/08/111/09/11

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