Foraging responses of the larvae of invasive bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus): possible implications for bullfrog control and ecological impact in China

Chunxia Xu, Xu Gao, Michael R. Crossland, Zetian Liu, Supen Wang, Wei Zhu, Richard Shine, Yiming Li*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The predatory behavior of invasive species can affect their ecological impact, and offer opportunities for targeted control. In Australia, tadpoles of invasive cane toads (Rhinella marina) do not consume eggs of native anurans, but are strongly attracted to (and consume) newly-laid eggs of conspecifics; chemical cues from such eggs (or adult secretions) thus can be used to attract toad tadpoles to traps. Do other invasive anurans show similar selectivity? Our laboratory trials on a Chinese population of invasive American bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus) revealed similar behaviors as exhibited by Australian cane toads. Bullfrog tadpoles rarely consumed the eggs of native anurans, but were attracted to both bullfrog eggs and bullfrog skin secretions. Although the attraction response was less intense in bullfrogs than in cane toads, it might nonetheless enable selective removal of bullfrog tadpoles from invaded sites.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)253-261
Number of pages9
JournalAsian Herpetological Research
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • alien species
  • biocontrol
  • Bufo marinus
  • pheromone
  • Rhinella marina
  • Lithobates catesbeianus
  • tadpole ecology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Foraging responses of the larvae of invasive bullfrogs (<i>Lithobates catesbeianus</i>): possible implications for bullfrog control and ecological impact in China'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this