Forensic methods for detection of deniable encryption in mobile networks

Angela Irwin*, Ray Hunt

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Conventional security mechanisms providing confidentiality, integrity and authentication are facing new challenges in modern wired and wireless networks. Deniable encryption allows encrypted data to be decrypted to different sensible plaintexts, depending on the key used or otherwise makes it impossible to prove the existence of the real message without the proper encryption key. This allows the sender to have plausible deniability if compelled to give up their encryption key. Deniable file systems allow for the creation of an encrypted volume on a hard disk and a second, hidden deniable file system created inside with access by a second password. The objective of this research is to establish whether or not evidence of a hidden volume can be found in deniable encryption tools using conventional forensic analysis. A testbed is developed using open source deniable encryption software and forensics tools with the objective of proving or disproving this claim.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2009 IEEE Pacific Rim Conference on Communications, Computers and Signal Processing, PACRIM 2009
Place of PublicationPiscataway, NJ
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
Pages169-174
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)9781424445615
ISBN (Print)9781424445608
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes
EventPACRIM 2009 - 2009 IEEE Pacific Rim Conference on Communications, Computers and Signal Processing - Victoria, BC, Canada
Duration: 23 Aug 200926 Aug 2009

Other

OtherPACRIM 2009 - 2009 IEEE Pacific Rim Conference on Communications, Computers and Signal Processing
CountryCanada
CityVictoria, BC
Period23/08/0926/08/09

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Forensic methods for detection of deniable encryption in mobile networks'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this